Controversial Old St Mellons Gypsy site plans withdrawn

June 28, 2012 1 Comment »

The site on Druidstone Road where five gypsy pitches had been planned. The plans have now been withdrawn.

Controversial plans to build a gypsy and traveller camp on Wales’ most expensive street have been withdrawn.

Proposals were submitted to Cardiff Council for five gypsy and traveller caravan pitches on a swathe of countryside-designated land on Druidstone Road.

With an average house price of £685,000, the single-lane road was last year ranked the most expensive place to live in Wales and is home to some of the nation’s most prominent business executives.

Objectors to the proposals included businessman Sir Stanley Thomas, former Cardiff Blues chief executive Robert Norster, and Andrew Howell, managing director of Cardiff-based survival gear specialists BCB International Ltd.

But yesterday it emerged the applicants for the gypsy and traveller plot development had withdrawn their plans.

Residents expressed their relief at the decision.

A 46-year-old homeowner, who did not want to be named, said: “Obviously, everyone is going to be pleased that it has been withdrawn, but to me it’s criminal because it has devalued our homes. Our village has been tarnished.”

The site on Druidstone Road is owned by Michael Evans, but his architect, Keith Chichester, had previously said his client was “not party” to the gypsy camp planning application.

The application was submitted by Mr L Callaghan, of Wentloog, Cardiff. Attempts to contact Mr Callaghan have been unsuccessful. Mr Callaghan’s application stated he wanted to create one static gypsy pitch for his family and four touring gypsy pitches with individual purpose-built amenity blocks.

The current Cardiff development plan does not identify any sites to accommodate established demand for extra gypsy and traveller pitches, the application added. The site was “intended to meet in part the established requirement of gypsy and traveller pitches in the Cardiff area”.

More than 40 objections were submitted, including from local Conservative councillor Dianne Rees and Labour councillor Georgina Phillips.

Estate agent Kelvin Francis has three properties for sale on Druidstone Road, with prices ranging between £650,000 and £700,000. Director Tony Filice said:

“I think it’s an appropriate action because, with regard to an application for a gypsy camp, there would be more suitable areas.”

He added: “When a person purchases a property, they will always look at neighbours. We are not critical of gypsy camps, but they would influence individuals.”

The applicant and the owner of the site could not be reached for comment last night.

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One Comment

  1. Lavengro July 2, 2012 at 10:32 am - Reply

    "A 46-year-old homeowner, who did not want to be named, said: “Obviously, everyone is going to be pleased that it has been withdrawn, but to me it’s criminal because it has devalued our homes. Our village has been tarnished.”

    In regard to the above comment, I am not surprised that the commenter has hidden behind the anonymity. Such open casual racism does not help the anti-protesters at all, and maybe shows what some protesters real objections are?

    Why has the very mention of the possibility of having two recognised ethnic minorities living in close proximity to some pricey property ‘criminal’. Would Mr/Mrs Anon so freely spout similar nonsense if the proposed purchasers were of another recognised ethnicity? Or would they just grumble about it quietly behind closed doors or in the golf club bar? It is a pity that they are not out in the open so we could all have a decent discussion.

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